Cornelius is a commander in the Roman army; he’s also a man of faith, who prays often and gives to the poor. One day, during his afternoon prayers, he has a vision. An angel appears to him and says that God has received his prayers and gifts as a memorial offering.

Imagine that. God sees Cornelius’s prayers and help of those in need as a gift directly given to him; it is an offering, a memorial offering: something done in his name.

I don’t know if God accepts all our prayers as memorial offerings or holds all our efforts to help others in such high esteem, but it is something to contemplate.

I think to be counted as a memorial, it must be done in Jesus’ name. And to be received as an offering, it must be presented with right motives. So when we do things for Jesus with pure intentions, it may be that God will likewise receive our actions as a memorial offering to him.

As a kid, I was confused by how we could directly give to God. Maybe this is how. May all we do be a memorial offering to him.

[Acts 10:4]

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4 Comments

  • Ben Posted July 11, 2016 9:59 am

    “I think to counter as a memorial, it must be done in Jesus’name.”

    But, Cornelius’ prayer memorial offering wasn’t done in Jesus’ name; he wasn’t yet a Christ follower.

    • Peter DeHaan Posted July 11, 2016 11:15 am

      This is an interesting point Ben; thanks for commenting, but I wonder if this distinction is important to Jesus.

  • Bishop Benson Posted April 21, 2018 12:05 pm

    Thank sir, I am so inspiring by your comments. Stay blessed.

    • Peter DeHaan Posted April 21, 2018 12:39 pm

      And blessings to you, too. Thanks for stopping by, Bishop Benson!

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