The Implications of Omnipotence

The Implications of Omnipotence

In my post “Omni God,” I mentioned that, among other things, God is “omnipotent.” This means that God possesses unlimited strength and has universal power and authority.

God’s Omnipotence

The word omnipotent occurs in Amplified Bible, but most translations use “almighty” instead, often in the form of a proper name, as in the Almighty, God Almighty, Lord God Almighty. Almighty means having absolute power or being all-powerful.

God is omnipotent, with unlimited power and authority, so there’s nothing that he can’t do—including no prayer that he can’t answer.

  • David said, “I call on you, my God, for you will answer me” (Psalm 17:6).
  • Jesus said, “Everyone who asks receives” (Luke 11:9-10).
  • John said, “We know that we have what we asked of him” (1 John 5:14-15).

God’s Sovereignty

A related word is sovereign, which means to exercise supreme, permanent authority. God’s sovereignty is not so that he can be malevolent towards us, but to be benevolent. He does not want to withhold things from us, but to give things to us.

God is omnipotent and sovereign, able to answer prayer, so we can confidently ask with the expectation that he will answer (more on that in my next post, God Answers Prayer). Also see “The Implications of Omniscience” and “The Implications of Omnipresence.”

God’s omnipotence and sovereignty reveals that he has the ability and desire to answer our prayers.

[Read through the Bible with us this year. Today’s reading is Matthew 5-7, and today’s post is on Matthew 7:11.]

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical spirituality, often with a postmodern slant. He seeks a fresh approach to faith and following God through the lens of scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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