Gadgets to Go

What perplexes me, however, are the security questions—they are either too simple or too hard.

Packing My Gadgets

First, I had my camera and the associated paraphernalia—spare battery, charger, data cable, and extra memory card. Since I was attending as a photojournalist, my camera was a requisite tool.

Next was the computer with all its accouterments. I needed it as a functional viewing tool—it’s amazing how perfect a shot can appear on the camera’s tiny screen only to later find it is unusable. The computer also serves as a backup device. Normally, I would have my thumb drive for a third backup, but I forgot it. I’ve never lost any files going through airport security, but why take unnecessary risks?

Traveling with all that electronics gear made me feel a bit like a techno geek. Click To Tweet

The third item was my digital recorder, which I used to record three podcasts. It’s a slick device, holding up to 100 hours of recordings.  When I transfer the files to my computer, they automatically convert to MP3 files, ready for playing or posting. The fourth item was my iPod, which I used to pass the time in the airport and the plane (when allowed) listening to other people’s podcasts.

Last was my cell phone. Of course, there were a myriad of associated items that accompanied each device.

Keeping Track of My Gadgets

In the end, I had more pieces of technical gear than items of clothing—seriously.

I was concerned about keeping track of them all, especially smaller items, such as the iPod. Once I was so focused caring for my digital recorder, that I left my camera on a table. Fortunately, it was still there when I returned in a panic a few minutes later.

Later, I misplaced my digital recorder, eventually discovering that the breast pocket in my sports coat had a small hole and the sly device had worked its way into the garment’s lining. It was quite a challenge to extricate it from its little burrow.

Anyway traveling with all that electronics gear made me feel a bit like a techno geek—wait a minute, I am.

What perplexes me, however, are the security questions—they are either too simple or too hard.

Do you like this post? Want to read more? Check out Peter’s book, Woodpecker Wars: Discovering the Spirituality of Every Day Life, available wherever books are sold.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical spirituality, often with a postmodern slant. He seeks a fresh approach to faith and following God through the lens of scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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