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Christian Living

We Are Body, Soul, and Spirit

Most Christians Have a Worldly Perception of Themselves Instead of a Spiritual One

We live in a physical world. As such, we are readily aware that we have a body. If we stop to contemplate it, we may admit to the possibility of having a soul, too—whatever that means. But what about a spirit?

In our reality, which we readily see and experience, the idea of spirit seems a bit of a stretch. Yet, Paul writes that we are comprised of body, soul, and spirit (1 Thessalonians 5:23).

However, he reverses the order. He lists spirit first, as if it is most important, then soul, and lastly body, almost as inconsequential.

Body, Soul, and Spirit

Though I don’t know the origin, I’ve heard it said, “We are a spirit, we have a soul, and we live in a body.” That saying is likely built on Paul’s teaching. Furthermore, our soul is said to comprise our mind, will, and emotion.

The more I think about it, the more I am intrigued—and the more I like the order of the words: spirit, soul, body.

We know our body is temporary; that is obvious. It will one day cease to function, and our body will die. Yet, our spirit will live on. This suggests our spirit is more important and significant than our body. If so, our spirit and soul should control our body, not our body dictating our soul or spirit.

Consider eating. Our body wants food, so we feed it, sometimes gaining weight in the process. Then we go on a diet. Our soul (mind, will, and emotion) resists the body’s insatiable call for more.

If we’re successful, we lose weight. But do we keep it off? Not likely—not unless our spirit gets involved. When our spirit is in control, our soul follows, and we keep our body’s cravings in check.

We are a spirit, we have a soul, and we live in a body. This gives us much to consider and can reform our reality, if we will let it.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Bible Insights

Spirit, Soul, and Body

The Bible says that our being—our entity—is comprised of spirit, soul, and body. That is something to contemplate.

At first glance, I’d be inclined to reverse the order, from the most tangible (body) to the least (spirit).

However, considering that Godwho is spiritmade us in his image, it is appropriate to list spirit first, thereby making it foremost. Seemingly, it is our spiritnot our bodywhere our primary essence exists.

My friend Nate explains it this way: We are a spirit, we have a soul (comprising of mind, will, and emotion), and we live in a body.

Our body, where our spirit and soul currently resides, is both temporal and temporary; it is finite and will one day end.

Our spirit, however, is not likewise restricted. That is another thing to contemplate.

Could there be a spiritual realm that is more real than the physical realm in which we live? I hope so; I think so.

[Read through the Bible with us this year. Today’s reading is 1 Thessalonians 4-5, and today’s post is on 1 Thessalonians 5:23.]

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Bible Insights

Living in the Physical and Spiritual Realms

Living in the Physical and Spiritual Realms

We live in a physical world. We can interact with it though our senses. It is tangible. It is real.

While this is true, there is more—much more. There is a spiritual reality that is even more real then the physical realm that we call home. Consider that God exists in the spiritual realm. It existed first and always has.

It is from this spiritual reality that he created our physical world in which we live. (Don’t get distracted on how this creation occurred.)

In his letter to the people who lived in Thessalonica, Paul talks about our spirit, soul, and body. How do these three aspects of who we are interact and co-exist?

It’s been said that we are a spirit, we have a soul, and we live in a body. Furthermore, our soul is comprised of our mind, will, and emotions. That puts things in the proper order, giving us a good perspective on our existence and what is most important.

Although our body is temporal and will die, our spirit will live on, existing in the spiritual realm. Though it is good and right to take care of our body, it is wiser and better to care for our spirit, because we are a spirit, we just live in a body.

[Read through the Bible with us this year. Today’s reading is 1 Thessalonians 4-5, and today’s post is on 1 Thessalonians 5:23.]

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

Categories
Bible Insights

What’s Next After We Die?

What’s Next After We Die?

When We Die, What’s Next?

Paul, who diligently and ardently followed Jesus, was quite sure of the answer. He wrote, “The time of my spirit’s release from the body is at hand and I will soon go free.” [2 Timothy 2:4, The Amplified version]

We need to realize that we are more than a body—and that life is more than existing in the physical realm. It has been astutely said, “We are a spirit, we have a soul, and we live in a body.” [See 1 Thessalonians 5:23]

So, once our body dies, our spirit and soul continues on; for Paul that meant freedom.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.