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Bible Insights

The Bible Personifies Wisdom

What the Bible Teaches About Wisdom May Shock Us

The book of Proverbs talks a lot about wisdom. The word pops up in fifty-five versus in this thirty-one-chapter book. That’s a lot of wisdom. This may be the reason why many think of Proverbs as a book of wisdom.

As Solomon and his co-writers compile the proverbs in this book, the reoccurring theme of wisdom takes an interesting turn in chapter 8. In this, we see Wisdom personified.

This means instead of being an abstract concept to pursue, Wisdom takes on the characteristics of a person, perhaps the expression of a spiritual entity.

To consider Wisdom as a feminine side of God fills me with a sense of wonder and awe. Click To Tweet

Wisdom Personified Is Female

First, we’re introduced to Wisdom as female. I like that. Wisdom stands at the fork in the road. She calls us to listen. She speaks truth. The discerning accepts her words as right. They possess knowledge.

Then we read what Wisdom has to say. We encounter the words of Wisdom as someone speaking to us and advising us. It’s an interesting read. Be sure not to miss it.

Wisdom Witnessed Creation

Even more amazing, however, is what Wisdom reveals about herself. Midway through her discourse, Wisdom shocks us by saying she was there when Father God created our reality.

This means that Wisdom existed before creation. She was there prior to the beginning of time. She witnessed creation, therefore she wasn’t created.

This causes me to ask, just who is Wisdom?

I wonder if Wisdom is a facet of God. If so, I find comfort that God has a feminine side. To talk about God as our heavenly father and his son as our Savior, while comforting to most, is decidedly masculine. To consider Wisdom as a feminine side of God fills me with a sense of awe.

Though the Bible teaches us much about God, there’s so much more that we still don’t know. One day we will understand it all. After our time here on earth is over and we join God in the spiritual realm, he will explain everything to us—or maybe she will.

[Read through the Bible with us this year. Today’s reading is Proverbs 8-11, and today’s post is on Proverbs 8:27.]

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Christian Living

Pursue a God-Honoring Contentment

Discern When to Be Satisfied with What You Have and When to Yearn for More

Though some of our world live in an environment of true need, most people have their daily needs met. Yet they aren’t satisfied with having their basic requirements covered. They want more. And the more that most people have, the more they want.

These people live with a materialistic outlook. They’re never satisfied with what they have. They always crave for more. This is the reality today in developed countries around the world. Regardless of what these people have, they’re not satisfied. Whatever they have isn’t enough; they’re always yearning for more, grasping for what they don’t have.

Material Contentment

Instead of always seeking for more, we should strive to be content with what we have. God has blessed us with material provisions. We should thank him for his gifts and not seek more. We must learn to be content with what we have.

In fact, an unrestrained drive to accumulate more money and more possessions emerges as a disrespect for God. It’s a slap in his face, effectively saying that what he’s given isn’t enough.

We must stop this. We must learn to enjoy what we have and be thankful for it. All we need is to have the basics of life covered. Everything else is a bonus.

With God’s help, we can learn to be content with what we have: the size of our bank account, our home, our car, our clothes, our possessions, the money in our pocket, and on and on.

Most people today live beyond their means. They’re one paycheck away from disaster. And a few people live at their means. This is a better perspective. My goal, however, is to live beneath my means, which gives me more opportunity to bless others.

This doesn’t mean we shouldn’t set goals to make our life better. But it does mean we need to keep our ambitions in check. In the Bible, James gives us some commonsense advice to do this, crouching our plans with a caveat “If it’s the Lord’s will . . . ” (James 4:15).

Too many people are coasting their way toward heaven. Click To Tweet

Spiritual Contentment

There’s another element of commitment however, that we must address. It’s not our physical comforts, but our spiritual situation. We must never be content with that.

Yet most people are satisfied with their spiritual condition and their standing with God. Too many people are coasting their way toward heaven. And it’s sad for what they’re missing.

As for me, this is one area where I want more. When it comes to my relationship with God, what I have is not enough. I crave a deeper connection, greater supernatural insight, and a spiritual reality that I’ve so far just read about.

Conclusion

Each time I asked God for contentment with his tangible blessings—to protect me from a materialistic mindset—I’m quick to add a clarification. I also request from the Almighty that I’ll always desire more on a spiritual level. And that he will provide it.

May we be materially content and spiritually hungry.

Take a moment now, and thank God for what he’s given you.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Bible Insights

God as a Vine

Word Picture: Vine

Another word picture to help us better understand God is that he is the vine and we are the branches.

In this, God is revealed as the source of nourishment, the giver of life, and the means of support, sustenance, and existence.

For us, as branches, we are completely dependent on him for everything. We can produce fruit only through him. 

Also, just as fruit trees are pruned, so to, we are pruned in order to be more productive. 

Additionally, note that branches that are unproductive are removed.

[Read through the Bible with us this year. Today’s reading is John 13-15, and today’s post is on John 15:1-6.]

Read more in Peter’s new book, Living Water: 40 Reflections on Jesus’s Life and Love from the Gospel of John, available everywhere in e-book, paperback, and hardcover.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Christian Living

We Need Human Connection

God Created Us to Thrive in Community

In visiting congregations for my book 52 Churches, I realized the importance of community. Regardless of the music or the message we encountered during their service, the bigger factor in our experience was the human connection.

Make a Human Connection at Church

If I interacted with others before or after the service, I valued my time with them more highly. The opposite also proved true. When everyone ignored us—which happened too often—my reaction to my experience with them was less favorable.

Those churches that I recall most fondly are those where we had meaningful interactions with others. I wanted to return. Those churches that I felt no affinity toward were those where I had no human connection. This happened irrespective of what took place during the service.

It takes more than wonderful music and a meaningful message for church to provide what people really crave. We need each other. We need to form significant community.

Maintain Relationships with Others

Fostering community—enjoying human connection—emerges as a critical element, not only with church but also in all of life. This includes enjoying positive interactions with family, friends, and neighbors.

As we interact with others, we can show them the love of Jesus. We can do so with our words and through our actions.

Form Human Connections

Meeting in person is the best and easiest way to form significant connections with others. We’re good at looking each other face-to-face and talking. When fitting, we can enjoy an appropriate physical touch. This includes a handshake or hug.

Yet at present, our in-person interactions face severe limits. Although the details vary depending on where we live, what those around us expect, and what the government mandates, we face obstacles in connecting with others.

This could include social distancing, wearing face masks, and avoiding larger gatherings. These restrictions all inhibit our ability to form and maintain meaningful human interactions.

God never intended us to be alone. He promised he would never leave us, never turn his back on us. God is always with us. Click To Tweet

Pursue Connection with God

What about those times when we can’t meet with others? When we feel isolated? When loneliness overtakes us? God is there. He is with us. Never forget that.

God created us to live in community, just as he exists in community with Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. God never intended us to be alone (Genesis 2:18). He promised he would never leave us, never turn his back on us (Hebrews 13:5).

Regardless of the situation in our world and whether we can form human connections, God is always there. Our connection with him is what matters most.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Christian Living

Two Key Advantages of Community

We Benefit When We Share Our Joys and Burdens with Others

When God created us in his image, he put within us a desire for community. Just as God lives in community with himself—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—he wants us to be in community with him. He wants a relationship with us. He pursues us.

This same internal desire for connection with our creator extends to other people. God designed us to crave community with others too. No one is an island, existing in isolation.

Not only do we find fulfillment when we enjoy connection with God and with the people he created, but we also realize two key benefits from being in community.

Community Amplifies Our Joys

When something exciting happens to us our first instinct is to share our good news with someone else. This may be with family, friends, or our spiritual community—which for many is their church family.

But imagine experiencing something grand and having no one to share it with. Wouldn’t that lessen our elation? Wouldn’t that diminish our delight?

That’s why community is so critical to our emotional and spiritual well-being. When we can share our joys with someone else, the other person celebrates with us, and our joy doubles.

Community Helps Us Bear Our Burdens

In the same way when discouragement or despair hits, we seek someone who will listen, empathize, and encourage. Again, this may be a family member, a friend, or someone in our spiritual community.

This isn’t to dump our problems on another, but to seek support as we go through dark days.

Imagine having no one to talk to when we experience the downsides of life. How dreadful to need to walk through that by ourselves. Wouldn’t this amplify our agony? Wouldn’t this double our despair?

This shows why community is so essential to our overall welfare. When we can share our burdens with someone else, that person laments with us and our burden is cut in half. God created us for community.

May we find community and nurture it. May we contribute to it and benefit from it. Click To Tweet

Finding Spiritual Connection

Where do we find this community where we can share our joys and burdens? Family is a great start, but not all families function as a supportive community. If yours doesn’t, what role can you play to improve relationships within your family?

Next consider friends. This means genuine friends, not social media friends and not acquaintances, but real friends who are there for you through the good and the bad.

If you don’t have friends like this then either seek new friends, or, better yet, strive to offer this kind of support to the friends you do have.

Last is a community beyond family and friends. As followers of Jesus, this should be our church. But if you’re church doesn’t offer meaningful community that will celebrate your joys and help carry your burdens, then it’s time to work to improve the one you have, or, as a last option, to find a new one.

God created us for community. May we find that community and nurture it. May we contribute to it and benefit from it.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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52 Churches

A Great Sermon (Visiting Church #46)

I struggle through the first half of the service. I can’t identify what’s wrong. Despite their efforts at excellence, something turns me off.

Now is the minister’s turn. An affable man, with combed-back hair, he wears a gray vest and maroon shirt, open at the neck. He tells the congregation to follow along in their Bibles as he reads.

The verses aren’t displayed on the screens, and with our version not matching his, it’s hard to grasp the text. There’s a fill-in-the-blank outline in the bulletin, and I follow along as he speaks.

This information is duplicated overhead, with the missing words displayed at the appropriate time.

52 Churches, by Peter DeHaan

It takes me a while to focus, but I soon realize the minister’s a gifted communicator—and entertaining, too. I appreciate his style and welcome his insights about church discipline.

He soon wins me over. His instruction is practical, laced in love, and void of dogmatic proclamations (that sometimes occur in fundamental circles).

I note the key scripture verses he cites (1 Corinthians 5:1-13, Matthew 18:15-20, and 2 Corinthians 2:5-10), planning to study them further. He shares personal anecdotes of church discipline gone awry, contrasted with the practice done right.

We watch a comedy sketch video to illustrate his point. “Sin in the church, like leaven [yeast], affects everyone.” Churches must deal with it.

He ends his message by offering a “judgment-free time” for people to come forward to kneel on the steps of the stage and privately deal with any issue or conviction they have.

He and his wife make themselves available for those desiring prayer—a practice I wish more churches would adopt. Nearly twenty come forward and kneel. The Holy Spirit is at work.

Despite a slow start for me, the ending was great.

[Read about Church #45 and Church #47, start at the beginning of our journey, or learn more about Church # 46.]

Get your copy of 52 Churches and The 52 Churches Workbook today, available in e-book, paperback, and hardcover.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Christian Living

The Bible is the Big Book of Questions

Questions Arise as We Study the Bible and That’s Okay

In the post Is It Okay to Question God? I share stories of Job, Abraham, Moses, David, Mary, and Jesus. They all question God. Seriously, they do. But God doesn’t punish them for questioning him and his sovereignty. He listens. He’s patient.

Asking Questions Is Good

I suspect God appreciates their questions. It shows that they’re engaged with him. They have confidence to approach him. They have a relationship that allows for thoughtful questions.

I suspect God appreciates our questions too. It shows that we’re engaged with him. We have confidence to approach him. We have a relationship that allows for thoughtful questions. Our questions honor God and reveal our faith.

Not Asking Questions Is Harmful

In some groups, as well as some churches, people learn that they shouldn’t ask questions. Those who do, find out the hard way that there are consequences if they question authority or what they’re taught.

As a result, they end up blindly following whatever their leader says, whether good or bad. (This is a characteristic of a cult.)

And those who persist in asking questions face having the group ostracize or expel them, sometimes even kill them. Not being able to question faith-related items will fester inside us until our faith collapses. Just as asking questions draws us to God, not asking questions pushes us away.

Asking questions about what the Bible says proves we’re engaging with its words. Click To Tweet

The Book of Questions

As we read the Bible and study it, questions arise. Some people push these aside without giving them another thought. Others are afraid to give voice to their questions for fear it reveals a lack of faith. What if our questions show a deficit of understanding?

Yet others don’t fear these questions. Instead, they embrace questions as part of their faith journey. Asking questions about what the Bible says proves we’re engaging with its words. And by having the courage to ask these questions, it reveals our relationship with God.

We don’t fear him, afraid to question his Word. We love him, confident to ask questions about the Bible.

Asking questions proves we’re in relationship with God. Just as a student with a trusted teacher, we’re encouraged to think deeply and ask tough questions. This is because when we ask questions, we grow. We grow in our understanding of the Bible.

We grow in our faith. And we grow in our relationship with God.

Asking questions helps us grow closer to God. Isn’t this what he wants?

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Christian Living

What in Our Lives Distracts Us from God?

Remove Worldly Distractions to Make More Space for God

We live in a world of clutter. We’re surrounded by things that constantly demand our attention, if only for a fraction of a second. Some of it is our own doing, such as our technology with its 24/7 beeps and incessant call for our attention.

Other things are out of our control, such as the constant deluge of marketing messages that surround us in both our physical life and our online world. Beyond these two areas is our environment, the reality we create for ourselves to live in.

Combined, these things clutter our lives with constant distractions.

Each time one of these things encroaches our life, we make a split-second decision to give it attention or to ignore it. This happens so frequently that we seldom realize it, but it occurs several times each minute, maybe even each second.

Most of the time we deftly deflect these distractions, but when added together over the span of a day, they represent tens of thousands of potential distractions we must deal with.

Though we handle most of these interruptions subconsciously, they combine to weigh us down, to weary us and open us to interference. These needless micro-decisions compound over time to rob us of our self-discipline and weaken our self-control.

At best, this renders us ineffective, and at worst it opens us to temptation, because we have little decision-making energy left to fight it.

We must do what we can to seize control of our surroundings and remove the clutter from our reality as much as possible. Here are some steps to accomplish this.

Simplify Our Lives

There’s a saying that we don’t own things, but that things own us. There’s truth in this. Each thing we possess demands something of us. We must take care of it. We must find a place to put it. Does the utility of it exceed the demands that it’s presence places on us? Too often, I fear, the answer is no.

Our possessions take up space, both physically and mentally. We must get rid of what we don’t need, what doesn’t bring us joy, and what doesn’t add value to our lives. We must purge junk, because each item that we have represents another micro distraction.

Some people go so far as to say that if we haven’t use something in the past three months, we should get rid of it. I’m not that extreme, but I do experience joy each time I eliminate something that only clutters my life.

Reduce Distractions

I spend much of my working day in front of the computer. With dual screens and always online, technology provides many distractions. I must declutter my computer.

First, I pursue the goal of “inbox zero.” Quite simply, I strive to keep my email inbox empty. I don’t let things pile up, because I know that each pending message serves as a micro distraction all day long. Ten messages means ten distractions each time I glance at my inbox.

To work toward achieving this goal, I try to deal with all messages each time I check my inbox. This means I quickly delete, respond, or handle each one. But I don’t continually monitor my email. Instead I periodically check it and handle messages in batches.

Next, I apply this strategy to my web browser. My goal is to move toward one open tab. If I’m not careful, it’s easy for me to have ten or more tabs open. Yet I know, each open tab serves as another micro distraction each time I glance at my browser, which happens frequently throughout the day.

Right now, I have seven tabs open, that’s seven distractions each time I look at that screen. How many can I close? Each time I do, I eliminate one micro distraction.

Third, I also look at my physical desk. Each item laying on my desktop represents another chance for distraction. Ideally, I aim for one pile of papers, with the top sheet representing my focus for that moment. This way, when I glance away from my computer there’s only one thing to see.

It reminds me what I should be doing.

Celebrate That Less Is More

As we remove things that don’t matter, that don’t provide value, and that don’t fill us with joy, we can better focus on what remains. We can celebrate what stays, what matters most.

Though the idea that “less is more” is an anathema to our materialistic society, it’s a mindset we must diligently strive to reclaim.

Simplify Processes and Procedures

We should look at each thing we do in our life, both at work and at home. Over time, tasks balloon to encompass more steps and take more time than they need to. We must become an efficiency expert and look to streamline everything we do. As we pursue this, it gives us more space and more time.

The Simplest Solution Is Usually the Best

As we consider that less is more and look to simplify what we do, we come to the inescapable conclusion that the simplest solution is usually the best one. Don’t make anything more complicated than it needs to be. Streamline everything, and cut out all that doesn’t matter.

Embrace the Results

Why should we do this? Why should we strive to take more control of our lives by removing the distractions that reduce our ineffectiveness and rob us of peace? As we do this, it increases our effectiveness.

But more importantly, it also takes a huge swipe at the multitude of things that distract us from realizing God’s presence and threaten to push him to the side of our life or even outside it. God is present in every moment, but too often are endless distractions keep us from being aware of him.

We must remove things that distract us from God, so we can place him in the center of our reality. Click To Tweet

We must remove things that distract us from God, so we can place him in the center of our reality where he belongs. Though getting rid of some of our stuff may seem like a trivial exercise, it’s the first step to reducing distractions and embracing our Creator and Savior as the focus of our lives.

As God says, “Be still, and know that I am God” (Psalm 46:10, NIV). Removing distractions from our lives will help us do this.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Christian Living

Is It Okay to Question God?

God Won’t Strike Us Dead If We Question Him; He May Even Like It

Many people in the Bible question God. These aren’t fringe malcontents. They’re some of our favorite Bible characters and, I suspect, some of God’s favorite people too. They include Job, Abraham, Moses, David, Mary, and even Jesus.

I can’t recall a single verse where God strikes someone dead or punishes them because they question him.

Yes, Lots wife turns into a pillar of salt because she wants to return to her old way of living (Genesis 19:26). And Ananias and Sapphira are struck down dead because they lie to God (Acts 5:1-10).

But asking God questions seems to be okay.

Job Questions God

In the book of Job, God permits Satan to torment Job. In rapid succession, Satan strips everything from Job: his possessions, his children, and his health. Job wants to give up. Throughout the book, he asks God a string of accusatory questions. “Why?” he repeatedly asks (Job 3:11-23 and many more).

But God is patient with Job and then lovingly blesses him for his righteousness (Job 42:12-17).

Abraham Questions God

When God decides to destroy the city of Sodom, he lets Abraham know about his plans. Abraham questions God’s decision, wondering if God isn’t overreacting. The dialogue between Abraham’s questions and God’s answers ping-pong back and forth in excruciating detail.

I lose my patience just reading the passage, yet God is patient with Abraham and seems to honor his ongoing inquiries (Genesis 18:23-33)

Moses Questions God

Moses is also comfortable asking God questions. One time, God is fed up with his chosen people. He wants to wipe them out. Then he’ll start over with Moses. He offers to make Moses into a great nation. Instead of accepting God’s generous offer, Moses pushes back.

He challenges God’s decision. He asks God an impertinent question. Amazingly, God listens, and he relents. He doesn’t destroy the people, all because Moses intervenes and questions God (Exodus 32:11-14).

David Questions God

David, a man after God’s own heart, asks God a lot of questions. Just read through David’s writings in the book of Psalms. In many respects these serve as his prayer journal.

In his writing, it seems David alternates between unabashed praise of God and asking unrestrained questions of despair (Psalm 2:1, Psalm 10:1, Psalm 10:13, and many more). One more is most significant. David asks, “God, why have you ditched me?” (Psalm 22:1).

Mary Questions God

God sends an angel with incredible news to young Mary. He says she’ll give birth to the Messiah who the people are waiting for. Her first response is a question. “How can this happen since I’m a virgin?” Though she directs her question to the angel, it’s really meant for God.

When the angel explains that the Holy Spirit will supernaturally impregnate her, Mary accepts this. “May it be so” (Luke 1:34-38).

Jesus Questions God

Even Jesus questions his heavenly Father. It’s hard to believe, but that’s what happens. Just before his detractors execute him, Jesus prays. In his prayer, his question is formed as an imperative: “Don’t make me die, but if you insist, I will” (Mark 14:36).

What? This is why Jesus came: to die for us so we could be made right with Papa. So why would he request a last-minute reprieve? I don’t know, but he did.

Then as he’s dying in excruciating pain on the cross, he asks the most horrific question of all. Just as David asked centuries earlier, prophetically foreshadowing the life of Jesus, he asks, “God, why have you ditched me?” (Mark 15:34).

Yes, after this painful question, Jesus does die. But death doesn’t have the last word. Jesus overcomes death and lives anew, just as he and Papa planned from the beginning.

When God’s children question him, he’s patient and doesn’t punish them. If we’re in relationship with him, I don’t think he’ll punish us to question him either. Click To Tweet

To Question God is Okay

Just like Lot’s wife, turning from God and returning to our old way of life deserves punishment. So does lying to God’s Holy Spirit as Ananias and Sapphira did.

But based on the above examples from the Bible, we see that when God’s children question him, he’s patient and doesn’t punish them. And if we’re in relationship with him, I don’t think he’ll punish us to question him either. In fact, I think he rather enjoys it.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.

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Bible Insights

Is it Okay to Contend with God?

Job and His Friends Contend with God

Job’s life has crumbled. His wife turned on him. And his friends don’t help. After listening to their back-and-forth dialogue that accomplishes nothing, God interjects. At last he speaks.

At one point God says, “Will the one who contends with the Almighty correct him?” (Job 40:2). In this rhetorical question, two thoughts stand out. The first is the idea of contending with God, and the second is correcting him.

God enjoys it when we ask questions, just like Job. For in asking questions, we seek him. Click To Tweet

Contend with God

Though we could view God’s question as implying that he doesn’t want us to contend with him, I don’t think this is what he means.

One understanding of the word contend is to debate. Another is struggle. When it comes to God, these are strong words. It seems foolish for us to debate God, to struggle with him. God is sovereign. And we are far less than sovereign. Who are we to question him?

Yet I can’t think of any place in the Bible where God punishes his people for contending with him when they do so with respect. I can’t find a single verse that commands us not to question God or debate his ways.

In fact, I think God enjoys it when we ask questions—serious, soul-wrenching questions, just like Job.

For in asking questions, we seek him. And that’s what he wants.

Correct God

However, there’s a right way to contend with God and a wrong way. The wrong way is when we think we know better than him, when we try to correct him and tell him he made a mistake.

When we do this, we forget God is sovereign, and we try to elevate ourselves over him. This is foolish. And it separates us from God. This isn’t what he wants from us.

The Bible says, be angry and sin not (Ephesians 4:26). In parallel fashion, we can also say, contend with God and don’t correct him. That gives us the balance we need. God enjoys our sincere questions, but we must never forget he is our sovereign Creator and we are the created.

[Read through the Bible this year. Today’s reading is Job 40-42, and today’s post is on Job 40:2.]

Discover more about Job in Peter’s book I Hope in Him: 40 Insights about Moving from Despair to Deliverance through the Life of Job. In it, we compare the text of Job to a modern screenplay.

Peter DeHaan writes about biblical Christianity to confront status quo religion and live a life that matters. He seeks a fresh approach to following Jesus through the lens of Scripture, without the baggage of made-up traditions and meaningless practices. Read more in his books, blog, and weekly email updates.